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on this issue. >> as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated, you yourself as a member of the senate voted against the debt ceiling increase, and in previous aspects of american history, president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush, and president clinton, deals contingent upon raising the debt ceiling and you yourself, related to debt or budget related maneuvers. and what many people are curious about the new adamant desire on your part not to negotiate that seems to conflict with the entire hire in the modern era of the presidents and the debt ceiling and your own debt ceiling and doesn't it suggest we're going into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about this. >> no, major, i think if you look at the history. getting votes for the debt ceiling is difficult and votes in in town are difficult. i went through this last year. what is different we never saw a situation like we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. >> lo
and work with republicans on critical issues like the current debt ceiling debate. they feel, some do, that he's been more isolationist and even aggressive towards the other side or, the word i'm looking for, antagonistic. and joining us a michael reagan, chairman of the reagan group. this is not just the president's critics saying it, bob woodward wrote in his book about a president obama who was a distant character, equally cool relationships with politicians and business leaders. those who know him, somebody who worked in the white house, an aide to president obama said that publicly he doesn't call anyone, he's not close to virtually anyone, he really doesn't like people. she later came out and apologized for saying that, but the criticism, he's not getting any deals done in part, not in full, but in part because he doesn't know how to forge relationships with his opponents. your thoughts? >> no, i think you're absolutely right and he's unwilling to do that. he feels empowered by the last election that somehow he's been empowered by the public to do exactly what he wants to do and
. the and the debt ceiling is a restraint. what the democrats want is a blank check. i'm not sure it's constitutional because congress rules on the issue of money, not the executive branch. so, i'm not sure the constitutionality of it. if you did abolish this debt ceiling, you would pretty soon get yourself a downgrade. these rating agencies would say, your debt is just running away. you're not credit worthy. >> megyn: the debt ceiling is in place, it doesn't seem they trust our lawmakers to live within their moneys and with the money. when you look at 16.4 trillion, they're right, we're not living in our means. and there's a question, stu, you see that number, i think of my kids and think of my children. who is going to pay that number? it's probably not going to be me. >> right. >> megyn: it's probably going to be my kids. >> look, for what is it, 238 years america's had a principle, we sacrifice today for the benefit of our children in the future. you remove that debt ceiling and you totally reversed that financial principle. what you're saying is, we will make our children pay in the future for t
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3